About Me

Ah the joys of reading and forwarding stupid text messages! Ramesh sent me this gem just now: (Spelling and formatting as in original)
Latest in SCHOOL . Twinkle twinkle little STAR. Just i went to tasmac BAR. Quarter rates are up so HIGH. I drunk a beer with chicken FRY!
Ah the joys of reading and forwarding stupid text messages! Ramesh sent me this gem just now: (Spelling and formatting as in original)
Latest in SCHOOL . Twinkle twinkle little STAR. Just i went to tasmac BAR. Quarter rates are up so HIGH. I drunk a beer with chicken FRY!
After a long time, side effects went book shopping. Penguin has turned 70, and in commemoration, they have come out with a set of 70 titles at 70 pence each - that converts to 56.65 in Indian rupees. The Landmark Sale gave them to me for 50 rupees! I bought: Michael Moore's Idiot Nation Vladimir Nabokov's Cloud, Castle, Lake Albert Camus' Summer in Algiers Gustave Flaubert's The Desert and the Dancing Girls Franz Kafka’s The Great Wall of China
David Lodge’s Scenes of Academic Life Noam Chomsky’s Doctrines and Visions Dave Eggers’ Short Short Stories Zadie Smith’s Martha and Hanwell Muriel Spark’s The Snobs Ah the joys of reading and forwarding stupid text messages! Ramesh sent me this gem just now: (Spelling and formatting as in original)
Latest in SCHOOL . Twinkle twinkle little STAR. Just i went to tasmac BAR. Quarter rates are up so HIGH. I drunk a beer with chicken FRY!
After a long time, side effects went book shopping. Penguin has turned 70, and in commemoration, they have come out with a set of 70 titles at 70 pence each - that converts to 56.65 in Indian rupees. The Landmark Sale gave them to me for 50 rupees! I bought: Michael Moore's Idiot Nation Vladimir Nabokov's Cloud, Castle, Lake Albert Camus' Summer in Algiers Gustave Flaubert's The Desert and the Dancing Girls Franz Kafka’s The Great Wall of China
David Lodge’s Scenes of Academic Life Noam Chomsky’s Doctrines and Visions Dave Eggers’ Short Short Stories Zadie Smith’s Martha and Hanwell Muriel Spark’s The Snobs The Hindu, ampoule normally a reliable-enough newspaper and not an institution given to playing practical jokes, store seems to be breaking new ground. This morning's paper contained an article that would not have been out of place in, say, Beeton's Christmas Annual, alongside the first appearance of A Study in Scarlet. It would have been hopelessly anachronistic even at the turn of the last century. The views and the manner in which they were expressed competed with each other for being embarrassingly retrograde, and any editor in the 1900s or after would have told the writer to get a life and stop writing. So, when I read this in this morning's paper, I was getting quite worked up, and tried to find out a bit more about the author. That was when I came across another piece she had written, also published in the Hindu, about a year ago. And that was when I realised that someone at the Hindu has been playing a cruel joke on the lady, suggesting to her that she apply her (supposedly) considerable writing skills and good sense to try and advise people on what is good for them and what they should think and do. And about once a year, this someone in the editorial department gets his or her laughs by publishing an article by her. It is time someone told the lady about this. On the other hand, what a great joke! Here's what was published today, and here's what was published about a year ago. Judge for yourself! Ah the joys of reading and forwarding stupid text messages! Ramesh sent me this gem just now: (Spelling and formatting as in original)
Latest in SCHOOL . Twinkle twinkle little STAR. Just i went to tasmac BAR. Quarter rates are up so HIGH. I drunk a beer with chicken FRY!
After a long time, side effects went book shopping. Penguin has turned 70, and in commemoration, they have come out with a set of 70 titles at 70 pence each - that converts to 56.65 in Indian rupees. The Landmark Sale gave them to me for 50 rupees! I bought: Michael Moore's Idiot Nation Vladimir Nabokov's Cloud, Castle, Lake Albert Camus' Summer in Algiers Gustave Flaubert's The Desert and the Dancing Girls Franz Kafka’s The Great Wall of China
David Lodge’s Scenes of Academic Life Noam Chomsky’s Doctrines and Visions Dave Eggers’ Short Short Stories Zadie Smith’s Martha and Hanwell Muriel Spark’s The Snobs The Hindu, ampoule normally a reliable-enough newspaper and not an institution given to playing practical jokes, store seems to be breaking new ground. This morning's paper contained an article that would not have been out of place in, say, Beeton's Christmas Annual, alongside the first appearance of A Study in Scarlet. It would have been hopelessly anachronistic even at the turn of the last century. The views and the manner in which they were expressed competed with each other for being embarrassingly retrograde, and any editor in the 1900s or after would have told the writer to get a life and stop writing. So, when I read this in this morning's paper, I was getting quite worked up, and tried to find out a bit more about the author. That was when I came across another piece she had written, also published in the Hindu, about a year ago. And that was when I realised that someone at the Hindu has been playing a cruel joke on the lady, suggesting to her that she apply her (supposedly) considerable writing skills and good sense to try and advise people on what is good for them and what they should think and do. And about once a year, this someone in the editorial department gets his or her laughs by publishing an article by her. It is time someone told the lady about this. On the other hand, what a great joke! Here's what was published today, and here's what was published about a year ago. Judge for yourself! I read a few blogs everyday. They are not too many, global burden of disease so I don't need a feed reader - I just use Live Bookmarks in Firefox. So, when I came across Google Reader, I was not too excited. However, since I use Gmail almost obsessively, and it gave me access to Reader, I'm tinkering around with it. Surprisingly, for a Google product, it seems to be extremely non-intuitive and buggy. Maybe its me and my unfamiliarity with feedreaders, but Google Reader is frustrating me even as I type this. My test feeds, which are nothing but repeated additions of the same Blogocentricity feed, refuse to go away - the unsubscribe option seems to work, but the feeds remain. The "Add a Feed" link merely previews, but does not add. The only way I can add a feed is by searching for the feed and then clicking on the "Subscribe" button. This is tedious, and quite ridiculous, especially when I have the feed url and just want to add it. I wait for Google Reader to be fixed. Ah the joys of reading and forwarding stupid text messages! Ramesh sent me this gem just now: (Spelling and formatting as in original)
Latest in SCHOOL . Twinkle twinkle little STAR. Just i went to tasmac BAR. Quarter rates are up so HIGH. I drunk a beer with chicken FRY!
After a long time, side effects went book shopping. Penguin has turned 70, and in commemoration, they have come out with a set of 70 titles at 70 pence each - that converts to 56.65 in Indian rupees. The Landmark Sale gave them to me for 50 rupees! I bought: Michael Moore's Idiot Nation Vladimir Nabokov's Cloud, Castle, Lake Albert Camus' Summer in Algiers Gustave Flaubert's The Desert and the Dancing Girls Franz Kafka’s The Great Wall of China
David Lodge’s Scenes of Academic Life Noam Chomsky’s Doctrines and Visions Dave Eggers’ Short Short Stories Zadie Smith’s Martha and Hanwell Muriel Spark’s The Snobs The Hindu, ampoule normally a reliable-enough newspaper and not an institution given to playing practical jokes, store seems to be breaking new ground. This morning's paper contained an article that would not have been out of place in, say, Beeton's Christmas Annual, alongside the first appearance of A Study in Scarlet. It would have been hopelessly anachronistic even at the turn of the last century. The views and the manner in which they were expressed competed with each other for being embarrassingly retrograde, and any editor in the 1900s or after would have told the writer to get a life and stop writing. So, when I read this in this morning's paper, I was getting quite worked up, and tried to find out a bit more about the author. That was when I came across another piece she had written, also published in the Hindu, about a year ago. And that was when I realised that someone at the Hindu has been playing a cruel joke on the lady, suggesting to her that she apply her (supposedly) considerable writing skills and good sense to try and advise people on what is good for them and what they should think and do. And about once a year, this someone in the editorial department gets his or her laughs by publishing an article by her. It is time someone told the lady about this. On the other hand, what a great joke! Here's what was published today, and here's what was published about a year ago. Judge for yourself! I read a few blogs everyday. They are not too many, global burden of disease so I don't need a feed reader - I just use Live Bookmarks in Firefox. So, when I came across Google Reader, I was not too excited. However, since I use Gmail almost obsessively, and it gave me access to Reader, I'm tinkering around with it. Surprisingly, for a Google product, it seems to be extremely non-intuitive and buggy. Maybe its me and my unfamiliarity with feedreaders, but Google Reader is frustrating me even as I type this. My test feeds, which are nothing but repeated additions of the same Blogocentricity feed, refuse to go away - the unsubscribe option seems to work, but the feeds remain. The "Add a Feed" link merely previews, but does not add. The only way I can add a feed is by searching for the feed and then clicking on the "Subscribe" button. This is tedious, and quite ridiculous, especially when I have the feed url and just want to add it. I wait for Google Reader to be fixed. After reading both Karthik's and Hemanth's reviews of Ghajini, urticaria I, after enduring the damn thing, am going, "Du-ude!" in my best Chandler imitation. Karthik calls it "an eminently enjoyable movie." Du-ude - didn't you hear "Bo... Zo..." at the beginning of the movie? How can you call the scriptwork and screenplay "tidy?" Were there not innumerable holes in the whole thing, least of which is Surya living in the same apartment where he got his head bashed in, and yet the villain not knowing; he's got "kill him" scrawled all over the damn place, yet his auditor, his doctor and his assistant let him be, and, Asin plans to go all the way to Mumbai in a sitting train. Come on! Hemanth goes one step further and says that "Ghajini is a good entertainer with a great adaptation by A R Murugadoss and Surya." Du-ude! Both Karthik and Hemanth watch way more Tamil movies than I do - the last two tamil movies I watched were Chandramukhi and Kaakha Kaakha - and so, should know much more about what they are saying. Does this mean that this is the best Tamil entertainment that one can get today? If this is "enjoyable" and an "entertainer" I shudder to think what the others will be like. For an occasional moviegoer like me, Ghajini seemed to be an atrocious waste of time. And, can someone tell me why the movie is called what it is called? Ah the joys of reading and forwarding stupid text messages! Ramesh sent me this gem just now: (Spelling and formatting as in original)
Latest in SCHOOL . Twinkle twinkle little STAR. Just i went to tasmac BAR. Quarter rates are up so HIGH. I drunk a beer with chicken FRY!
After a long time, side effects went book shopping. Penguin has turned 70, and in commemoration, they have come out with a set of 70 titles at 70 pence each - that converts to 56.65 in Indian rupees. The Landmark Sale gave them to me for 50 rupees! I bought: Michael Moore's Idiot Nation Vladimir Nabokov's Cloud, Castle, Lake Albert Camus' Summer in Algiers Gustave Flaubert's The Desert and the Dancing Girls Franz Kafka’s The Great Wall of China
David Lodge’s Scenes of Academic Life Noam Chomsky’s Doctrines and Visions Dave Eggers’ Short Short Stories Zadie Smith’s Martha and Hanwell Muriel Spark’s The Snobs The Hindu, ampoule normally a reliable-enough newspaper and not an institution given to playing practical jokes, store seems to be breaking new ground. This morning's paper contained an article that would not have been out of place in, say, Beeton's Christmas Annual, alongside the first appearance of A Study in Scarlet. It would have been hopelessly anachronistic even at the turn of the last century. The views and the manner in which they were expressed competed with each other for being embarrassingly retrograde, and any editor in the 1900s or after would have told the writer to get a life and stop writing. So, when I read this in this morning's paper, I was getting quite worked up, and tried to find out a bit more about the author. That was when I came across another piece she had written, also published in the Hindu, about a year ago. And that was when I realised that someone at the Hindu has been playing a cruel joke on the lady, suggesting to her that she apply her (supposedly) considerable writing skills and good sense to try and advise people on what is good for them and what they should think and do. And about once a year, this someone in the editorial department gets his or her laughs by publishing an article by her. It is time someone told the lady about this. On the other hand, what a great joke! Here's what was published today, and here's what was published about a year ago. Judge for yourself! I read a few blogs everyday. They are not too many, global burden of disease so I don't need a feed reader - I just use Live Bookmarks in Firefox. So, when I came across Google Reader, I was not too excited. However, since I use Gmail almost obsessively, and it gave me access to Reader, I'm tinkering around with it. Surprisingly, for a Google product, it seems to be extremely non-intuitive and buggy. Maybe its me and my unfamiliarity with feedreaders, but Google Reader is frustrating me even as I type this. My test feeds, which are nothing but repeated additions of the same Blogocentricity feed, refuse to go away - the unsubscribe option seems to work, but the feeds remain. The "Add a Feed" link merely previews, but does not add. The only way I can add a feed is by searching for the feed and then clicking on the "Subscribe" button. This is tedious, and quite ridiculous, especially when I have the feed url and just want to add it. I wait for Google Reader to be fixed. After reading both Karthik's and Hemanth's reviews of Ghajini, urticaria I, after enduring the damn thing, am going, "Du-ude!" in my best Chandler imitation. Karthik calls it "an eminently enjoyable movie." Du-ude - didn't you hear "Bo... Zo..." at the beginning of the movie? How can you call the scriptwork and screenplay "tidy?" Were there not innumerable holes in the whole thing, least of which is Surya living in the same apartment where he got his head bashed in, and yet the villain not knowing; he's got "kill him" scrawled all over the damn place, yet his auditor, his doctor and his assistant let him be, and, Asin plans to go all the way to Mumbai in a sitting train. Come on! Hemanth goes one step further and says that "Ghajini is a good entertainer with a great adaptation by A R Murugadoss and Surya." Du-ude! Both Karthik and Hemanth watch way more Tamil movies than I do - the last two tamil movies I watched were Chandramukhi and Kaakha Kaakha - and so, should know much more about what they are saying. Does this mean that this is the best Tamil entertainment that one can get today? If this is "enjoyable" and an "entertainer" I shudder to think what the others will be like. For an occasional moviegoer like me, Ghajini seemed to be an atrocious waste of time. And, can someone tell me why the movie is called what it is called? Okay, drugs Vibhu hit the nail on the head when he said that Ghajini was named after Mahmud of Ghazni, hepatitis apparently because he relentlessly pursues the villains in spite of his failures and help from Nayantara. This was confirmed by the Ghajini website, which says, "Ghajini the name is a metaphor for assiduous try." Enough said. Which led me to look up what Mahmud was actually trying, when I came across (what else) the Wikipedia entry for Mahmud of Ghazni. Looks like he wasn't trying as much as he was doing again and again what he did well! And the Ghajini website did throw in a few gems as well: On Asin: "Her easy-going smile is good enough to bloom thousand roses." On Nayantara: "An actress who is buxom, blithe and debonair." I also found out that Murugadoss directed Vijayakant in Ramana. Now, if I had known that before I wrote my reaction... Lesson learnt: Go through a movie's website before watching it. Or at least before writing about it! Ah the joys of reading and forwarding stupid text messages! Ramesh sent me this gem just now: (Spelling and formatting as in original)
Latest in SCHOOL . Twinkle twinkle little STAR. Just i went to tasmac BAR. Quarter rates are up so HIGH. I drunk a beer with chicken FRY!
After a long time, side effects went book shopping. Penguin has turned 70, and in commemoration, they have come out with a set of 70 titles at 70 pence each - that converts to 56.65 in Indian rupees. The Landmark Sale gave them to me for 50 rupees! I bought: Michael Moore's Idiot Nation Vladimir Nabokov's Cloud, Castle, Lake Albert Camus' Summer in Algiers Gustave Flaubert's The Desert and the Dancing Girls Franz Kafka’s The Great Wall of China
David Lodge’s Scenes of Academic Life Noam Chomsky’s Doctrines and Visions Dave Eggers’ Short Short Stories Zadie Smith’s Martha and Hanwell Muriel Spark’s The Snobs The Hindu, ampoule normally a reliable-enough newspaper and not an institution given to playing practical jokes, store seems to be breaking new ground. This morning's paper contained an article that would not have been out of place in, say, Beeton's Christmas Annual, alongside the first appearance of A Study in Scarlet. It would have been hopelessly anachronistic even at the turn of the last century. The views and the manner in which they were expressed competed with each other for being embarrassingly retrograde, and any editor in the 1900s or after would have told the writer to get a life and stop writing. So, when I read this in this morning's paper, I was getting quite worked up, and tried to find out a bit more about the author. That was when I came across another piece she had written, also published in the Hindu, about a year ago. And that was when I realised that someone at the Hindu has been playing a cruel joke on the lady, suggesting to her that she apply her (supposedly) considerable writing skills and good sense to try and advise people on what is good for them and what they should think and do. And about once a year, this someone in the editorial department gets his or her laughs by publishing an article by her. It is time someone told the lady about this. On the other hand, what a great joke! Here's what was published today, and here's what was published about a year ago. Judge for yourself! I read a few blogs everyday. They are not too many, global burden of disease so I don't need a feed reader - I just use Live Bookmarks in Firefox. So, when I came across Google Reader, I was not too excited. However, since I use Gmail almost obsessively, and it gave me access to Reader, I'm tinkering around with it. Surprisingly, for a Google product, it seems to be extremely non-intuitive and buggy. Maybe its me and my unfamiliarity with feedreaders, but Google Reader is frustrating me even as I type this. My test feeds, which are nothing but repeated additions of the same Blogocentricity feed, refuse to go away - the unsubscribe option seems to work, but the feeds remain. The "Add a Feed" link merely previews, but does not add. The only way I can add a feed is by searching for the feed and then clicking on the "Subscribe" button. This is tedious, and quite ridiculous, especially when I have the feed url and just want to add it. I wait for Google Reader to be fixed. After reading both Karthik's and Hemanth's reviews of Ghajini, urticaria I, after enduring the damn thing, am going, "Du-ude!" in my best Chandler imitation. Karthik calls it "an eminently enjoyable movie." Du-ude - didn't you hear "Bo... Zo..." at the beginning of the movie? How can you call the scriptwork and screenplay "tidy?" Were there not innumerable holes in the whole thing, least of which is Surya living in the same apartment where he got his head bashed in, and yet the villain not knowing; he's got "kill him" scrawled all over the damn place, yet his auditor, his doctor and his assistant let him be, and, Asin plans to go all the way to Mumbai in a sitting train. Come on! Hemanth goes one step further and says that "Ghajini is a good entertainer with a great adaptation by A R Murugadoss and Surya." Du-ude! Both Karthik and Hemanth watch way more Tamil movies than I do - the last two tamil movies I watched were Chandramukhi and Kaakha Kaakha - and so, should know much more about what they are saying. Does this mean that this is the best Tamil entertainment that one can get today? If this is "enjoyable" and an "entertainer" I shudder to think what the others will be like. For an occasional moviegoer like me, Ghajini seemed to be an atrocious waste of time. And, can someone tell me why the movie is called what it is called? Okay, drugs Vibhu hit the nail on the head when he said that Ghajini was named after Mahmud of Ghazni, hepatitis apparently because he relentlessly pursues the villains in spite of his failures and help from Nayantara. This was confirmed by the Ghajini website, which says, "Ghajini the name is a metaphor for assiduous try." Enough said. Which led me to look up what Mahmud was actually trying, when I came across (what else) the Wikipedia entry for Mahmud of Ghazni. Looks like he wasn't trying as much as he was doing again and again what he did well! And the Ghajini website did throw in a few gems as well: On Asin: "Her easy-going smile is good enough to bloom thousand roses." On Nayantara: "An actress who is buxom, blithe and debonair." I also found out that Murugadoss directed Vijayakant in Ramana. Now, if I had known that before I wrote my reaction... Lesson learnt: Go through a movie's website before watching it. Or at least before writing about it! Okay, drugs Vibhu hit the nail on the head when he said that Ghajini was named after Mahmud of Ghazni, hepatitis apparently because he relentlessly pursues the villains in spite of his failures and help from Nayantara. This was confirmed by the Ghajini website, which says, "Ghajini the name is a metaphor for assiduous try." Enough said. Which led me to look up what Mahmud was actually trying, when I came across (what else) the Wikipedia entry for Mahmud of Ghazni. Looks like he wasn't trying as much as he was doing again and again what he did well! And the Ghajini website did throw in a few gems as well: On Asin: "Her easy-going smile is good enough to bloom thousand roses." On Nayantara: "An actress who is buxom, blithe and debonair." I also found out that Murugadoss directed Vijayakant in Ramana. Now, if I had known that before I wrote my reaction... Lesson learnt: Go through a movie's website before watching it. Or at least before writing about it! Karthik narrates an interesting tale. Only a few days ago, approved Magesh and Murali were regaling me with such stories - commonly called kisu kisu. When I pressed them for their sources, they came out with a list of real-life Rita Skeeters - gossip columnists who wrote under particularly well-known pseudonyms. Maybe each pseudonym was used by a team of writers, but is it more exciting to think of them as Rita Skeeter-like individuals. What started off this thread of thought was the name used to sign off the story Karthik narrated - Vamban, which means (very loosely translated, of course) one who indulges in loose talk. Other similar names, according to Magesh, include Mister Kazhugu (Mr. Eagle) in Junior Vikatan, News Poochchi (News Insect) in Vannathirai and Karuppu Poonai (Black Cat) in Dina Malar! Ah the joys of reading and forwarding stupid text messages! Ramesh sent me this gem just now: (Spelling and formatting as in original)
Latest in SCHOOL . Twinkle twinkle little STAR. Just i went to tasmac BAR. Quarter rates are up so HIGH. I drunk a beer with chicken FRY!
After a long time, side effects went book shopping. Penguin has turned 70, and in commemoration, they have come out with a set of 70 titles at 70 pence each - that converts to 56.65 in Indian rupees. The Landmark Sale gave them to me for 50 rupees! I bought: Michael Moore's Idiot Nation Vladimir Nabokov's Cloud, Castle, Lake Albert Camus' Summer in Algiers Gustave Flaubert's The Desert and the Dancing Girls Franz Kafka’s The Great Wall of China
David Lodge’s Scenes of Academic Life Noam Chomsky’s Doctrines and Visions Dave Eggers’ Short Short Stories Zadie Smith’s Martha and Hanwell Muriel Spark’s The Snobs The Hindu, ampoule normally a reliable-enough newspaper and not an institution given to playing practical jokes, store seems to be breaking new ground. This morning's paper contained an article that would not have been out of place in, say, Beeton's Christmas Annual, alongside the first appearance of A Study in Scarlet. It would have been hopelessly anachronistic even at the turn of the last century. The views and the manner in which they were expressed competed with each other for being embarrassingly retrograde, and any editor in the 1900s or after would have told the writer to get a life and stop writing. So, when I read this in this morning's paper, I was getting quite worked up, and tried to find out a bit more about the author. That was when I came across another piece she had written, also published in the Hindu, about a year ago. And that was when I realised that someone at the Hindu has been playing a cruel joke on the lady, suggesting to her that she apply her (supposedly) considerable writing skills and good sense to try and advise people on what is good for them and what they should think and do. And about once a year, this someone in the editorial department gets his or her laughs by publishing an article by her. It is time someone told the lady about this. On the other hand, what a great joke! Here's what was published today, and here's what was published about a year ago. Judge for yourself! I read a few blogs everyday. They are not too many, global burden of disease so I don't need a feed reader - I just use Live Bookmarks in Firefox. So, when I came across Google Reader, I was not too excited. However, since I use Gmail almost obsessively, and it gave me access to Reader, I'm tinkering around with it. Surprisingly, for a Google product, it seems to be extremely non-intuitive and buggy. Maybe its me and my unfamiliarity with feedreaders, but Google Reader is frustrating me even as I type this. My test feeds, which are nothing but repeated additions of the same Blogocentricity feed, refuse to go away - the unsubscribe option seems to work, but the feeds remain. The "Add a Feed" link merely previews, but does not add. The only way I can add a feed is by searching for the feed and then clicking on the "Subscribe" button. This is tedious, and quite ridiculous, especially when I have the feed url and just want to add it. I wait for Google Reader to be fixed. After reading both Karthik's and Hemanth's reviews of Ghajini, urticaria I, after enduring the damn thing, am going, "Du-ude!" in my best Chandler imitation. Karthik calls it "an eminently enjoyable movie." Du-ude - didn't you hear "Bo... Zo..." at the beginning of the movie? How can you call the scriptwork and screenplay "tidy?" Were there not innumerable holes in the whole thing, least of which is Surya living in the same apartment where he got his head bashed in, and yet the villain not knowing; he's got "kill him" scrawled all over the damn place, yet his auditor, his doctor and his assistant let him be, and, Asin plans to go all the way to Mumbai in a sitting train. Come on! Hemanth goes one step further and says that "Ghajini is a good entertainer with a great adaptation by A R Murugadoss and Surya." Du-ude! Both Karthik and Hemanth watch way more Tamil movies than I do - the last two tamil movies I watched were Chandramukhi and Kaakha Kaakha - and so, should know much more about what they are saying. Does this mean that this is the best Tamil entertainment that one can get today? If this is "enjoyable" and an "entertainer" I shudder to think what the others will be like. For an occasional moviegoer like me, Ghajini seemed to be an atrocious waste of time. And, can someone tell me why the movie is called what it is called? Okay, drugs Vibhu hit the nail on the head when he said that Ghajini was named after Mahmud of Ghazni, hepatitis apparently because he relentlessly pursues the villains in spite of his failures and help from Nayantara. This was confirmed by the Ghajini website, which says, "Ghajini the name is a metaphor for assiduous try." Enough said. Which led me to look up what Mahmud was actually trying, when I came across (what else) the Wikipedia entry for Mahmud of Ghazni. Looks like he wasn't trying as much as he was doing again and again what he did well! And the Ghajini website did throw in a few gems as well: On Asin: "Her easy-going smile is good enough to bloom thousand roses." On Nayantara: "An actress who is buxom, blithe and debonair." I also found out that Murugadoss directed Vijayakant in Ramana. Now, if I had known that before I wrote my reaction... Lesson learnt: Go through a movie's website before watching it. Or at least before writing about it! Okay, drugs Vibhu hit the nail on the head when he said that Ghajini was named after Mahmud of Ghazni, hepatitis apparently because he relentlessly pursues the villains in spite of his failures and help from Nayantara. This was confirmed by the Ghajini website, which says, "Ghajini the name is a metaphor for assiduous try." Enough said. Which led me to look up what Mahmud was actually trying, when I came across (what else) the Wikipedia entry for Mahmud of Ghazni. Looks like he wasn't trying as much as he was doing again and again what he did well! And the Ghajini website did throw in a few gems as well: On Asin: "Her easy-going smile is good enough to bloom thousand roses." On Nayantara: "An actress who is buxom, blithe and debonair." I also found out that Murugadoss directed Vijayakant in Ramana. Now, if I had known that before I wrote my reaction... Lesson learnt: Go through a movie's website before watching it. Or at least before writing about it! Karthik narrates an interesting tale. Only a few days ago, approved Magesh and Murali were regaling me with such stories - commonly called kisu kisu. When I pressed them for their sources, they came out with a list of real-life Rita Skeeters - gossip columnists who wrote under particularly well-known pseudonyms. Maybe each pseudonym was used by a team of writers, but is it more exciting to think of them as Rita Skeeter-like individuals. What started off this thread of thought was the name used to sign off the story Karthik narrated - Vamban, which means (very loosely translated, of course) one who indulges in loose talk. Other similar names, according to Magesh, include Mister Kazhugu (Mr. Eagle) in Junior Vikatan, News Poochchi (News Insect) in Vannathirai and Karuppu Poonai (Black Cat) in Dina Malar! Finally, website like this I get off my backside and write about the ongoing plastering IIPM is getting from the Blogosphere. I was about to write war, but it hardly seems that, does it? The blogosphere is consistently proving itself one step ahead of IIPM, but what one fears is the establishment, which has not proved itself very tech-savvy in the past. So much has been written on this that anything I say will be mere repetition. Kaps' call to action and Zuckerman's concise version of the events, along with Desipundit's painstaking chronicling of the whole fiasco should suffice for a primer. Of course, Desipundit has also linked to many blog posts on this topic. So, what now, you ask. Kiruba has made some buttons you can put on your site to show your support for the Blogosphere. Arzan has put up an online petition that you can sign on Petitiononline. You can also use one of the buttons here to link to the petition, and to call your visitors' attention to the issue. You can also link them to any of the numerous posts on various blogs about this issue. All these buttons were made using the 80x15 Brilliant Button Maker. Based on your level of outrage, you can show your support, call for people to boycott IIPM or just let off steam by saying IIPM sucks!





Ah the joys of reading and forwarding stupid text messages! Ramesh sent me this gem just now: (Spelling and formatting as in original)
Latest in SCHOOL . Twinkle twinkle little STAR. Just i went to tasmac BAR. Quarter rates are up so HIGH. I drunk a beer with chicken FRY!
After a long time, side effects went book shopping. Penguin has turned 70, and in commemoration, they have come out with a set of 70 titles at 70 pence each - that converts to 56.65 in Indian rupees. The Landmark Sale gave them to me for 50 rupees! I bought: Michael Moore's Idiot Nation Vladimir Nabokov's Cloud, Castle, Lake Albert Camus' Summer in Algiers Gustave Flaubert's The Desert and the Dancing Girls Franz Kafka’s The Great Wall of China
David Lodge’s Scenes of Academic Life Noam Chomsky’s Doctrines and Visions Dave Eggers’ Short Short Stories Zadie Smith’s Martha and Hanwell Muriel Spark’s The Snobs The Hindu, ampoule normally a reliable-enough newspaper and not an institution given to playing practical jokes, store seems to be breaking new ground. This morning's paper contained an article that would not have been out of place in, say, Beeton's Christmas Annual, alongside the first appearance of A Study in Scarlet. It would have been hopelessly anachronistic even at the turn of the last century. The views and the manner in which they were expressed competed with each other for being embarrassingly retrograde, and any editor in the 1900s or after would have told the writer to get a life and stop writing. So, when I read this in this morning's paper, I was getting quite worked up, and tried to find out a bit more about the author. That was when I came across another piece she had written, also published in the Hindu, about a year ago. And that was when I realised that someone at the Hindu has been playing a cruel joke on the lady, suggesting to her that she apply her (supposedly) considerable writing skills and good sense to try and advise people on what is good for them and what they should think and do. And about once a year, this someone in the editorial department gets his or her laughs by publishing an article by her. It is time someone told the lady about this. On the other hand, what a great joke! Here's what was published today, and here's what was published about a year ago. Judge for yourself! I read a few blogs everyday. They are not too many, global burden of disease so I don't need a feed reader - I just use Live Bookmarks in Firefox. So, when I came across Google Reader, I was not too excited. However, since I use Gmail almost obsessively, and it gave me access to Reader, I'm tinkering around with it. Surprisingly, for a Google product, it seems to be extremely non-intuitive and buggy. Maybe its me and my unfamiliarity with feedreaders, but Google Reader is frustrating me even as I type this. My test feeds, which are nothing but repeated additions of the same Blogocentricity feed, refuse to go away - the unsubscribe option seems to work, but the feeds remain. The "Add a Feed" link merely previews, but does not add. The only way I can add a feed is by searching for the feed and then clicking on the "Subscribe" button. This is tedious, and quite ridiculous, especially when I have the feed url and just want to add it. I wait for Google Reader to be fixed. After reading both Karthik's and Hemanth's reviews of Ghajini, urticaria I, after enduring the damn thing, am going, "Du-ude!" in my best Chandler imitation. Karthik calls it "an eminently enjoyable movie." Du-ude - didn't you hear "Bo... Zo..." at the beginning of the movie? How can you call the scriptwork and screenplay "tidy?" Were there not innumerable holes in the whole thing, least of which is Surya living in the same apartment where he got his head bashed in, and yet the villain not knowing; he's got "kill him" scrawled all over the damn place, yet his auditor, his doctor and his assistant let him be, and, Asin plans to go all the way to Mumbai in a sitting train. Come on! Hemanth goes one step further and says that "Ghajini is a good entertainer with a great adaptation by A R Murugadoss and Surya." Du-ude! Both Karthik and Hemanth watch way more Tamil movies than I do - the last two tamil movies I watched were Chandramukhi and Kaakha Kaakha - and so, should know much more about what they are saying. Does this mean that this is the best Tamil entertainment that one can get today? If this is "enjoyable" and an "entertainer" I shudder to think what the others will be like. For an occasional moviegoer like me, Ghajini seemed to be an atrocious waste of time. And, can someone tell me why the movie is called what it is called? Okay, drugs Vibhu hit the nail on the head when he said that Ghajini was named after Mahmud of Ghazni, hepatitis apparently because he relentlessly pursues the villains in spite of his failures and help from Nayantara. This was confirmed by the Ghajini website, which says, "Ghajini the name is a metaphor for assiduous try." Enough said. Which led me to look up what Mahmud was actually trying, when I came across (what else) the Wikipedia entry for Mahmud of Ghazni. Looks like he wasn't trying as much as he was doing again and again what he did well! And the Ghajini website did throw in a few gems as well: On Asin: "Her easy-going smile is good enough to bloom thousand roses." On Nayantara: "An actress who is buxom, blithe and debonair." I also found out that Murugadoss directed Vijayakant in Ramana. Now, if I had known that before I wrote my reaction... Lesson learnt: Go through a movie's website before watching it. Or at least before writing about it! Okay, drugs Vibhu hit the nail on the head when he said that Ghajini was named after Mahmud of Ghazni, hepatitis apparently because he relentlessly pursues the villains in spite of his failures and help from Nayantara. This was confirmed by the Ghajini website, which says, "Ghajini the name is a metaphor for assiduous try." Enough said. Which led me to look up what Mahmud was actually trying, when I came across (what else) the Wikipedia entry for Mahmud of Ghazni. Looks like he wasn't trying as much as he was doing again and again what he did well! And the Ghajini website did throw in a few gems as well: On Asin: "Her easy-going smile is good enough to bloom thousand roses." On Nayantara: "An actress who is buxom, blithe and debonair." I also found out that Murugadoss directed Vijayakant in Ramana. Now, if I had known that before I wrote my reaction... Lesson learnt: Go through a movie's website before watching it. Or at least before writing about it! Karthik narrates an interesting tale. Only a few days ago, approved Magesh and Murali were regaling me with such stories - commonly called kisu kisu. When I pressed them for their sources, they came out with a list of real-life Rita Skeeters - gossip columnists who wrote under particularly well-known pseudonyms. Maybe each pseudonym was used by a team of writers, but is it more exciting to think of them as Rita Skeeter-like individuals. What started off this thread of thought was the name used to sign off the story Karthik narrated - Vamban, which means (very loosely translated, of course) one who indulges in loose talk. Other similar names, according to Magesh, include Mister Kazhugu (Mr. Eagle) in Junior Vikatan, News Poochchi (News Insect) in Vannathirai and Karuppu Poonai (Black Cat) in Dina Malar! Finally, website like this I get off my backside and write about the ongoing plastering IIPM is getting from the Blogosphere. I was about to write war, but it hardly seems that, does it? The blogosphere is consistently proving itself one step ahead of IIPM, but what one fears is the establishment, which has not proved itself very tech-savvy in the past. So much has been written on this that anything I say will be mere repetition. Kaps' call to action and Zuckerman's concise version of the events, along with Desipundit's painstaking chronicling of the whole fiasco should suffice for a primer. Of course, Desipundit has also linked to many blog posts on this topic. So, what now, you ask. Kiruba has made some buttons you can put on your site to show your support for the Blogosphere. Arzan has put up an online petition that you can sign on Petitiononline. You can also use one of the buttons here to link to the petition, and to call your visitors' attention to the issue. You can also link them to any of the numerous posts on various blogs about this issue. All these buttons were made using the 80x15 Brilliant Button Maker. Based on your level of outrage, you can show your support, call for people to boycott IIPM or just let off steam by saying IIPM sucks!





At the helm!

I write. I travel. I read. But not necessarily in that order. I was trained as an anthropologist, buy viagra and I did the usual round of projects for big-name organisations, cost before selling out and switching to writing content. Various assignments and jobs later, about it find myself working for one of the world's best known technology companies. I spent the first twenty years of my life in Coimbatore, a small town near the Kerala-Tamilnadu border that calls itself a city. The next eleven years were spent, studying, then working, in Chennai, which was formerly known as Madras, on South India's east coast. I now live and work in Hyderabad, a town fast on the way to becoming India's hi-tech capital. What free time I have, I use to read and write, though I can't say I do enough of both. Music, I listen to when I can, and movies are an occasional indulgence. I am excited by technology, and what it can do in influencing and creating social contexts. I am also interested in how it can be used as a tool for empowerment. Mediawatching is another of my interests - almost inevitable today for anyone interested in technology. I go birding whenever and wherever I can - my best experience has been waiting for and watching the Great Indian Hornbill in Top Slip. I also like ancient architecture - the Brihadeeswara Temple at Gangaikondacholapuram being a favourite. Of course, indulging in my interests inevitably leads to travel. Write to me at navin[at]mail[dot]com.