Birds from my Balcony

The Forest Path The Forest Path Went birding in Anantagiri Hills this morning. The place is 88 kilometers from my place in Hafeezpet, sildenafil and Ajith and I drove down. We made an early start, overweight leaving at 5 in the morning. The roads were nearly empty, and the drive was comfortable. Anantagiri Hills is just past Viqarabad, reached from Hyderabad through Moinabad and Chevella. The roads were good, though the ever-changing geography of the roads to the airport made it a bit tricky. As we were driving on the perimeter wall of the Gandipet lake, a sleepy Brahminy kite was startled out of its stupour as it lazily glided in front of us. Further down the road, a peahen flew across the road in front of us. Just outside Viqarabad, we saw a black-winged hawk alight on a treetop in front of us. However, he would not stop for us, and went on his way when we tried to take a picture of him. Just before we reached Anantagiri, a grey hornbill did the same thing to us. We reached Anantagiri at about 6:30. The Ananta Padmanabha Swamy temple there is thronged by droves of devotees, but not early in the morning. Right in front of the temple is the path leading down into the scrub jungle. This is really good brding territory, and the air was thick with birdsong. A roller greeted us at the entrance to the path, and a hornbill kept taunting us, flying about, but keeping out of even Ajith's photographic range. The Forest Path We had a pleasant walk surrounded by birds. Parakeets screamed overhead as they zipped from treetop to distant treetop. Babblers kept up their constant chatter as they moved in a cloud from tree to ground and back to tree again. The disproportionately loud song of numerous sunbirds were all around us. Tree pies and pipits and nuthatches were everywhere. As we ventured deeper into the scrub, we could hear the distant calls of peafowl, but never got to see them. At one point, we scrambled up a little hillock, but found nothing on top. Coming down however, we got a good look at a couple of yellow-toed green pigeons. When we got back from our walk, we got breakfast at a small restaurant called Saniya at Anantagiri - puri and bhaji served on a piece of newspaper! On the way back, we stopped at a largish pond by the roadside, where we spotted a black ibis and a few red-wattled lapwings. A quick drive back brought us home for lunch. The Forest Path Went birding in Anantagiri Hills this morning. The place is 88 kilometers from my place in Hafeezpet, sildenafil and Ajith and I drove down. We made an early start, overweight leaving at 5 in the morning. The roads were nearly empty, and the drive was comfortable. Anantagiri Hills is just past Viqarabad, reached from Hyderabad through Moinabad and Chevella. The roads were good, though the ever-changing geography of the roads to the airport made it a bit tricky. As we were driving on the perimeter wall of the Gandipet lake, a sleepy Brahminy kite was startled out of its stupour as it lazily glided in front of us. Further down the road, a peahen flew across the road in front of us. Just outside Viqarabad, we saw a black-winged hawk alight on a treetop in front of us. However, he would not stop for us, and went on his way when we tried to take a picture of him. Just before we reached Anantagiri, a grey hornbill did the same thing to us. We reached Anantagiri at about 6:30. The Ananta Padmanabha Swamy temple there is thronged by droves of devotees, but not early in the morning. Right in front of the temple is the path leading down into the scrub jungle. This is really good brding territory, and the air was thick with birdsong. A roller greeted us at the entrance to the path, and a hornbill kept taunting us, flying about, but keeping out of even Ajith's photographic range. The Forest Path We had a pleasant walk surrounded by birds. Parakeets screamed overhead as they zipped from treetop to distant treetop. Babblers kept up their constant chatter as they moved in a cloud from tree to ground and back to tree again. The disproportionately loud song of numerous sunbirds were all around us. Tree pies and pipits and nuthatches were everywhere. As we ventured deeper into the scrub, we could hear the distant calls of peafowl, but never got to see them. At one point, we scrambled up a little hillock, but found nothing on top. Coming down however, we got a good look at a couple of yellow-toed green pigeons. When we got back from our walk, we got breakfast at a small restaurant called Saniya at Anantagiri - puri and bhaji served on a piece of newspaper! On the way back, we stopped at a largish pond by the roadside, where we spotted a black ibis and a few red-wattled lapwings. A quick drive back brought us home for lunch. Went birding in Anantagiri Hills this morning. It is 88 kilometers from my place in Hafeezpet, nurse and Ajith and I drove down. We made an early start, urologist leaving at 5 in the morning. The roads were nearly empty and the drive was comfortable. Anantagiri Hills is just past Viqarabad, reached from Hyderabad through Moinabad and Chevella. The roads were good, though the ever-changing geography of the way to the airport made it a bit tricky. As we were driving on the perimeter wall of the Gandipet lake, a sleepy Brahminy kite was startled out of its stupour as it lazily glided in front of us. Further down the road, a peahen flew across the road in front of us. Just outside Viqarabad, we saw a black-winged hawk alight on a treetop in front of us. However, he would not stop for us, and went on his way when we tried to take a picture of him. Just before we reached Anantagiri, a grey hornbill did the same thing to us. We reached Anantagiri at about 6:30. The Ananta Padmanabha Swamy temple there is thronged by droves of devotees, but not early in the morning. Right in front of the temple is the path leading down into the scrub jungle. This is really good brding territory, and the air was thick with birdsong. A roller greeted us at the entrance to the path, and a hornbill kept taunting us, flying about, but keeping out of even Ajith's photographic range. The Forest Path We had a pleasant walk surrounded by birds. Parakeets screamed overhead as they zipped from treetop to distant treetop. Babblers kept up their constant chatter as they moved in a cloud from tree to ground and back to tree again. The disproportionately loud song of numerous sunbirds were all around us. Tree pies and pipits and nuthatches were everywhere. As we ventured deeper into the scrub, we could hear the distant calls of peafowl, but never got to see them. At one point, we scrambled up a little hillock, but found nothing on top. Coming down however, we got a good look at a couple of yellow-toed green pigeons. When we got back from our walk, we got breakfast at a small restaurant called Saniya at Anantagiri - puri and bhaji served on a piece of newspaper! On the way back, we stopped at a largish pond by the roadside, where we spotted a black ibis and a few red-wattled lapwings. A quick drive back brought us home for lunch. The Forest Path Went birding in Anantagiri Hills this morning. The place is 88 kilometers from my place in Hafeezpet, sildenafil and Ajith and I drove down. We made an early start, overweight leaving at 5 in the morning. The roads were nearly empty, and the drive was comfortable. Anantagiri Hills is just past Viqarabad, reached from Hyderabad through Moinabad and Chevella. The roads were good, though the ever-changing geography of the roads to the airport made it a bit tricky. As we were driving on the perimeter wall of the Gandipet lake, a sleepy Brahminy kite was startled out of its stupour as it lazily glided in front of us. Further down the road, a peahen flew across the road in front of us. Just outside Viqarabad, we saw a black-winged hawk alight on a treetop in front of us. However, he would not stop for us, and went on his way when we tried to take a picture of him. Just before we reached Anantagiri, a grey hornbill did the same thing to us. We reached Anantagiri at about 6:30. The Ananta Padmanabha Swamy temple there is thronged by droves of devotees, but not early in the morning. Right in front of the temple is the path leading down into the scrub jungle. This is really good brding territory, and the air was thick with birdsong. A roller greeted us at the entrance to the path, and a hornbill kept taunting us, flying about, but keeping out of even Ajith's photographic range. The Forest Path We had a pleasant walk surrounded by birds. Parakeets screamed overhead as they zipped from treetop to distant treetop. Babblers kept up their constant chatter as they moved in a cloud from tree to ground and back to tree again. The disproportionately loud song of numerous sunbirds were all around us. Tree pies and pipits and nuthatches were everywhere. As we ventured deeper into the scrub, we could hear the distant calls of peafowl, but never got to see them. At one point, we scrambled up a little hillock, but found nothing on top. Coming down however, we got a good look at a couple of yellow-toed green pigeons. When we got back from our walk, we got breakfast at a small restaurant called Saniya at Anantagiri - puri and bhaji served on a piece of newspaper! On the way back, we stopped at a largish pond by the roadside, where we spotted a black ibis and a few red-wattled lapwings. A quick drive back brought us home for lunch. Went birding in Anantagiri Hills this morning. It is 88 kilometers from my place in Hafeezpet, nurse and Ajith and I drove down. We made an early start, urologist leaving at 5 in the morning. The roads were nearly empty and the drive was comfortable. Anantagiri Hills is just past Viqarabad, reached from Hyderabad through Moinabad and Chevella. The roads were good, though the ever-changing geography of the way to the airport made it a bit tricky. As we were driving on the perimeter wall of the Gandipet lake, a sleepy Brahminy kite was startled out of its stupour as it lazily glided in front of us. Further down the road, a peahen flew across the road in front of us. Just outside Viqarabad, we saw a black-winged hawk alight on a treetop in front of us. However, he would not stop for us, and went on his way when we tried to take a picture of him. Just before we reached Anantagiri, a grey hornbill did the same thing to us. We reached Anantagiri at about 6:30. The Ananta Padmanabha Swamy temple there is thronged by droves of devotees, but not early in the morning. Right in front of the temple is the path leading down into the scrub jungle. This is really good brding territory, and the air was thick with birdsong. A roller greeted us at the entrance to the path, and a hornbill kept taunting us, flying about, but keeping out of even Ajith's photographic range. The Forest Path We had a pleasant walk surrounded by birds. Parakeets screamed overhead as they zipped from treetop to distant treetop. Babblers kept up their constant chatter as they moved in a cloud from tree to ground and back to tree again. The disproportionately loud song of numerous sunbirds were all around us. Tree pies and pipits and nuthatches were everywhere. As we ventured deeper into the scrub, we could hear the distant calls of peafowl, but never got to see them. At one point, we scrambled up a little hillock, but found nothing on top. Coming down however, we got a good look at a couple of yellow-toed green pigeons. When we got back from our walk, we got breakfast at a small restaurant called Saniya at Anantagiri - puri and bhaji served on a piece of newspaper! On the way back, we stopped at a largish pond by the roadside, where we spotted a black ibis and a few red-wattled lapwings. A quick drive back brought us home for lunch. Went birding in Anantagiri Hills this morning. The place is 88 kilometers from my place in Hafeezpet, treatment and Ajith and I drove down. We made an early start, generic leaving at 5 in the morning. The roads were nearly empty, and the drive was comfortable. Anantagiri Hills is just past Viqarabad, reached from Hyderabad through Moinabad and Chevella. The roads were good, though the ever-changing geography of the roads to the airport made it a bit tricky. As we were driving on the perimeter wall of the Gandipet lake, a sleepy Brahminy kite was startled out of its stupour as it lazily glided in front of us. Further down the road, a peahen flew across the road in front of us. Just outside Viqarabad, we saw a black-winged hawk alight on a treetop in front of us. However, he would not stop for us, and went on his way when we tried to take a picture of him. Just before we reached Anantagiri, a grey hornbill did the same thing to us. We reached Anantagiri at about 6:30. The Ananta Padmanabha Swamy temple there is thronged by droves of devotees, but not early in the morning. Right in front of the temple is the path leading down into the scrub jungle. This is really good brding territory, and the air was thick with birdsong. A roller greeted us at the entrance to the path, and a hornbill kept taunting us, flying about, but keeping out of even Ajith's photographic range. The Forest Path We had a pleasant walk surrounded by birds. Parakeets screamed overhead as they zipped from treetop to distant treetop. Babblers kept up their constant chatter as they moved in a cloud from tree to ground and back to tree again. The disproportionately loud song of numerous sunbirds were all around us. Tree pies and pipits and nuthatches were everywhere. As we ventured deeper into the scrub, we could hear the distant calls of peafowl, but never got to see them. At one point, we scrambled up a little hillock, but found nothing on top. Coming down however, we got a good look at a couple of yellow-toed green pigeons. When we got back from our walk, we got breakfast at a small restaurant called Saniya at Anantagiri - puri and bhaji served on a piece of newspaper! On the way back, we stopped at a largish pond by the roadside, where we spotted a black ibis and a few red-wattled lapwings. A quick drive back brought us home for lunch. The Forest Path Went birding in Anantagiri Hills this morning. The place is 88 kilometers from my place in Hafeezpet, sildenafil and Ajith and I drove down. We made an early start, overweight leaving at 5 in the morning. The roads were nearly empty, and the drive was comfortable. Anantagiri Hills is just past Viqarabad, reached from Hyderabad through Moinabad and Chevella. The roads were good, though the ever-changing geography of the roads to the airport made it a bit tricky. As we were driving on the perimeter wall of the Gandipet lake, a sleepy Brahminy kite was startled out of its stupour as it lazily glided in front of us. Further down the road, a peahen flew across the road in front of us. Just outside Viqarabad, we saw a black-winged hawk alight on a treetop in front of us. However, he would not stop for us, and went on his way when we tried to take a picture of him. Just before we reached Anantagiri, a grey hornbill did the same thing to us. We reached Anantagiri at about 6:30. The Ananta Padmanabha Swamy temple there is thronged by droves of devotees, but not early in the morning. Right in front of the temple is the path leading down into the scrub jungle. This is really good brding territory, and the air was thick with birdsong. A roller greeted us at the entrance to the path, and a hornbill kept taunting us, flying about, but keeping out of even Ajith's photographic range. The Forest Path We had a pleasant walk surrounded by birds. Parakeets screamed overhead as they zipped from treetop to distant treetop. Babblers kept up their constant chatter as they moved in a cloud from tree to ground and back to tree again. The disproportionately loud song of numerous sunbirds were all around us. Tree pies and pipits and nuthatches were everywhere. As we ventured deeper into the scrub, we could hear the distant calls of peafowl, but never got to see them. At one point, we scrambled up a little hillock, but found nothing on top. Coming down however, we got a good look at a couple of yellow-toed green pigeons. When we got back from our walk, we got breakfast at a small restaurant called Saniya at Anantagiri - puri and bhaji served on a piece of newspaper! On the way back, we stopped at a largish pond by the roadside, where we spotted a black ibis and a few red-wattled lapwings. A quick drive back brought us home for lunch. Went birding in Anantagiri Hills this morning. It is 88 kilometers from my place in Hafeezpet, nurse and Ajith and I drove down. We made an early start, urologist leaving at 5 in the morning. The roads were nearly empty and the drive was comfortable. Anantagiri Hills is just past Viqarabad, reached from Hyderabad through Moinabad and Chevella. The roads were good, though the ever-changing geography of the way to the airport made it a bit tricky. As we were driving on the perimeter wall of the Gandipet lake, a sleepy Brahminy kite was startled out of its stupour as it lazily glided in front of us. Further down the road, a peahen flew across the road in front of us. Just outside Viqarabad, we saw a black-winged hawk alight on a treetop in front of us. However, he would not stop for us, and went on his way when we tried to take a picture of him. Just before we reached Anantagiri, a grey hornbill did the same thing to us. We reached Anantagiri at about 6:30. The Ananta Padmanabha Swamy temple there is thronged by droves of devotees, but not early in the morning. Right in front of the temple is the path leading down into the scrub jungle. This is really good brding territory, and the air was thick with birdsong. A roller greeted us at the entrance to the path, and a hornbill kept taunting us, flying about, but keeping out of even Ajith's photographic range. The Forest Path We had a pleasant walk surrounded by birds. Parakeets screamed overhead as they zipped from treetop to distant treetop. Babblers kept up their constant chatter as they moved in a cloud from tree to ground and back to tree again. The disproportionately loud song of numerous sunbirds were all around us. Tree pies and pipits and nuthatches were everywhere. As we ventured deeper into the scrub, we could hear the distant calls of peafowl, but never got to see them. At one point, we scrambled up a little hillock, but found nothing on top. Coming down however, we got a good look at a couple of yellow-toed green pigeons. When we got back from our walk, we got breakfast at a small restaurant called Saniya at Anantagiri - puri and bhaji served on a piece of newspaper! On the way back, we stopped at a largish pond by the roadside, where we spotted a black ibis and a few red-wattled lapwings. A quick drive back brought us home for lunch. Went birding in Anantagiri Hills this morning. The place is 88 kilometers from my place in Hafeezpet, treatment and Ajith and I drove down. We made an early start, generic leaving at 5 in the morning. The roads were nearly empty, and the drive was comfortable. Anantagiri Hills is just past Viqarabad, reached from Hyderabad through Moinabad and Chevella. The roads were good, though the ever-changing geography of the roads to the airport made it a bit tricky. As we were driving on the perimeter wall of the Gandipet lake, a sleepy Brahminy kite was startled out of its stupour as it lazily glided in front of us. Further down the road, a peahen flew across the road in front of us. Just outside Viqarabad, we saw a black-winged hawk alight on a treetop in front of us. However, he would not stop for us, and went on his way when we tried to take a picture of him. Just before we reached Anantagiri, a grey hornbill did the same thing to us. We reached Anantagiri at about 6:30. The Ananta Padmanabha Swamy temple there is thronged by droves of devotees, but not early in the morning. Right in front of the temple is the path leading down into the scrub jungle. This is really good brding territory, and the air was thick with birdsong. A roller greeted us at the entrance to the path, and a hornbill kept taunting us, flying about, but keeping out of even Ajith's photographic range. The Forest Path We had a pleasant walk surrounded by birds. Parakeets screamed overhead as they zipped from treetop to distant treetop. Babblers kept up their constant chatter as they moved in a cloud from tree to ground and back to tree again. The disproportionately loud song of numerous sunbirds were all around us. Tree pies and pipits and nuthatches were everywhere. As we ventured deeper into the scrub, we could hear the distant calls of peafowl, but never got to see them. At one point, we scrambled up a little hillock, but found nothing on top. Coming down however, we got a good look at a couple of yellow-toed green pigeons. When we got back from our walk, we got breakfast at a small restaurant called Saniya at Anantagiri - puri and bhaji served on a piece of newspaper! On the way back, we stopped at a largish pond by the roadside, where we spotted a black ibis and a few red-wattled lapwings. A quick drive back brought us home for lunch. An early morning walk around the Lotus Pond - Ajith and I have been planning this for a while, troche and managed to make it happen today.

The Lotus Pond

We set out early (by my standards that is!) and reached the Lotus Pond around seven. There were a few cars parked outside, healthful and there seemed to be quite a few people walking around. However, prosthetic the birds were pretty much minding their own business, and didn't seemed to mind us stopping and staring at them, and clicking away with our cameras.

A Purple Moorhen running on the leaves on the Lotus Pond

The atmosphere in the pond and the surrounding park was serene, and the morning sunshine was golden. On the water we saw a grey heron standing on a rock, Zen-master-like. All around it, coots and moorhens squabbled over who got to walk on which part of the water. A purple moorhen suddenly took umbrage and ran, screaming, across the lotus leaves that covered the water around the edges. All this action happened within the first couple of minutes of us entering the park.

Spotbills A spotbill in the air

We took a leisurely walk around the pond. A couple of spotbills kept us entertained for the most part - swimming around, taking off and landing again and again and squabbling with the coots. Apart from the water birds, we also saw quite a few land birds in the trees bordering the pond. Two brightly-coloured coppersmiths were the highlight among the land birds. The usual gang of sunbirds, warblers, bulbuls and drongos were all around the pond.

Ajith with his 170-500

Ajith was well-equipped for the birds - he had his Canon EOS 7D with a Sigma 170 - 500. I was just fooling around with my D3000 and the 18-55 kit lens. Here's a list of the birds we saw today:
    Large Cormorant Grey heron Spotbill Indian Moorhen Purple Moorhen Coot Bronzewinged Jacana Redwattled Lapwing Small Blue Kingfisher Coppersmith Redvented Bulbul Ashy wren-warbler Sunbirds Common Kite
And this is where the Lotus Pond is:


View Larger Map

The Forest Path Went birding in Anantagiri Hills this morning. The place is 88 kilometers from my place in Hafeezpet, sildenafil and Ajith and I drove down. We made an early start, overweight leaving at 5 in the morning. The roads were nearly empty, and the drive was comfortable. Anantagiri Hills is just past Viqarabad, reached from Hyderabad through Moinabad and Chevella. The roads were good, though the ever-changing geography of the roads to the airport made it a bit tricky. As we were driving on the perimeter wall of the Gandipet lake, a sleepy Brahminy kite was startled out of its stupour as it lazily glided in front of us. Further down the road, a peahen flew across the road in front of us. Just outside Viqarabad, we saw a black-winged hawk alight on a treetop in front of us. However, he would not stop for us, and went on his way when we tried to take a picture of him. Just before we reached Anantagiri, a grey hornbill did the same thing to us. We reached Anantagiri at about 6:30. The Ananta Padmanabha Swamy temple there is thronged by droves of devotees, but not early in the morning. Right in front of the temple is the path leading down into the scrub jungle. This is really good brding territory, and the air was thick with birdsong. A roller greeted us at the entrance to the path, and a hornbill kept taunting us, flying about, but keeping out of even Ajith's photographic range. The Forest Path We had a pleasant walk surrounded by birds. Parakeets screamed overhead as they zipped from treetop to distant treetop. Babblers kept up their constant chatter as they moved in a cloud from tree to ground and back to tree again. The disproportionately loud song of numerous sunbirds were all around us. Tree pies and pipits and nuthatches were everywhere. As we ventured deeper into the scrub, we could hear the distant calls of peafowl, but never got to see them. At one point, we scrambled up a little hillock, but found nothing on top. Coming down however, we got a good look at a couple of yellow-toed green pigeons. When we got back from our walk, we got breakfast at a small restaurant called Saniya at Anantagiri - puri and bhaji served on a piece of newspaper! On the way back, we stopped at a largish pond by the roadside, where we spotted a black ibis and a few red-wattled lapwings. A quick drive back brought us home for lunch. Went birding in Anantagiri Hills this morning. It is 88 kilometers from my place in Hafeezpet, nurse and Ajith and I drove down. We made an early start, urologist leaving at 5 in the morning. The roads were nearly empty and the drive was comfortable. Anantagiri Hills is just past Viqarabad, reached from Hyderabad through Moinabad and Chevella. The roads were good, though the ever-changing geography of the way to the airport made it a bit tricky. As we were driving on the perimeter wall of the Gandipet lake, a sleepy Brahminy kite was startled out of its stupour as it lazily glided in front of us. Further down the road, a peahen flew across the road in front of us. Just outside Viqarabad, we saw a black-winged hawk alight on a treetop in front of us. However, he would not stop for us, and went on his way when we tried to take a picture of him. Just before we reached Anantagiri, a grey hornbill did the same thing to us. We reached Anantagiri at about 6:30. The Ananta Padmanabha Swamy temple there is thronged by droves of devotees, but not early in the morning. Right in front of the temple is the path leading down into the scrub jungle. This is really good brding territory, and the air was thick with birdsong. A roller greeted us at the entrance to the path, and a hornbill kept taunting us, flying about, but keeping out of even Ajith's photographic range. The Forest Path We had a pleasant walk surrounded by birds. Parakeets screamed overhead as they zipped from treetop to distant treetop. Babblers kept up their constant chatter as they moved in a cloud from tree to ground and back to tree again. The disproportionately loud song of numerous sunbirds were all around us. Tree pies and pipits and nuthatches were everywhere. As we ventured deeper into the scrub, we could hear the distant calls of peafowl, but never got to see them. At one point, we scrambled up a little hillock, but found nothing on top. Coming down however, we got a good look at a couple of yellow-toed green pigeons. When we got back from our walk, we got breakfast at a small restaurant called Saniya at Anantagiri - puri and bhaji served on a piece of newspaper! On the way back, we stopped at a largish pond by the roadside, where we spotted a black ibis and a few red-wattled lapwings. A quick drive back brought us home for lunch. Went birding in Anantagiri Hills this morning. The place is 88 kilometers from my place in Hafeezpet, treatment and Ajith and I drove down. We made an early start, generic leaving at 5 in the morning. The roads were nearly empty, and the drive was comfortable. Anantagiri Hills is just past Viqarabad, reached from Hyderabad through Moinabad and Chevella. The roads were good, though the ever-changing geography of the roads to the airport made it a bit tricky. As we were driving on the perimeter wall of the Gandipet lake, a sleepy Brahminy kite was startled out of its stupour as it lazily glided in front of us. Further down the road, a peahen flew across the road in front of us. Just outside Viqarabad, we saw a black-winged hawk alight on a treetop in front of us. However, he would not stop for us, and went on his way when we tried to take a picture of him. Just before we reached Anantagiri, a grey hornbill did the same thing to us. We reached Anantagiri at about 6:30. The Ananta Padmanabha Swamy temple there is thronged by droves of devotees, but not early in the morning. Right in front of the temple is the path leading down into the scrub jungle. This is really good brding territory, and the air was thick with birdsong. A roller greeted us at the entrance to the path, and a hornbill kept taunting us, flying about, but keeping out of even Ajith's photographic range. The Forest Path We had a pleasant walk surrounded by birds. Parakeets screamed overhead as they zipped from treetop to distant treetop. Babblers kept up their constant chatter as they moved in a cloud from tree to ground and back to tree again. The disproportionately loud song of numerous sunbirds were all around us. Tree pies and pipits and nuthatches were everywhere. As we ventured deeper into the scrub, we could hear the distant calls of peafowl, but never got to see them. At one point, we scrambled up a little hillock, but found nothing on top. Coming down however, we got a good look at a couple of yellow-toed green pigeons. When we got back from our walk, we got breakfast at a small restaurant called Saniya at Anantagiri - puri and bhaji served on a piece of newspaper! On the way back, we stopped at a largish pond by the roadside, where we spotted a black ibis and a few red-wattled lapwings. A quick drive back brought us home for lunch. An early morning walk around the Lotus Pond - Ajith and I have been planning this for a while, troche and managed to make it happen today.

The Lotus Pond

We set out early (by my standards that is!) and reached the Lotus Pond around seven. There were a few cars parked outside, healthful and there seemed to be quite a few people walking around. However, prosthetic the birds were pretty much minding their own business, and didn't seemed to mind us stopping and staring at them, and clicking away with our cameras.

A Purple Moorhen running on the leaves on the Lotus Pond

The atmosphere in the pond and the surrounding park was serene, and the morning sunshine was golden. On the water we saw a grey heron standing on a rock, Zen-master-like. All around it, coots and moorhens squabbled over who got to walk on which part of the water. A purple moorhen suddenly took umbrage and ran, screaming, across the lotus leaves that covered the water around the edges. All this action happened within the first couple of minutes of us entering the park.

Spotbills A spotbill in the air

We took a leisurely walk around the pond. A couple of spotbills kept us entertained for the most part - swimming around, taking off and landing again and again and squabbling with the coots. Apart from the water birds, we also saw quite a few land birds in the trees bordering the pond. Two brightly-coloured coppersmiths were the highlight among the land birds. The usual gang of sunbirds, warblers, bulbuls and drongos were all around the pond.

Ajith with his 170-500

Ajith was well-equipped for the birds - he had his Canon EOS 7D with a Sigma 170 - 500. I was just fooling around with my D3000 and the 18-55 kit lens. Here's a list of the birds we saw today:
    Large Cormorant Grey heron Spotbill Indian Moorhen Purple Moorhen Coot Bronzewinged Jacana Redwattled Lapwing Small Blue Kingfisher Coppersmith Redvented Bulbul Ashy wren-warbler Sunbirds Common Kite
And this is where the Lotus Pond is:


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There's a drumstick tree just outside my second floor (third floor if you're American) balcony. This tree is perpetually flowering, population health and attracts a whole bunch of birds. The top of the tree is just below my balcony - so get a bird's eye view of the life of birds, so to speak! This morning, I was fooling around with Pranav's 55-200 lens and I finally could get some decent pictures of some of the birds. As usual, the noisy sunbirds were in attendance, and an ashy prinia wwas hanging around, but the real star of the day was the one-legged sparrow that Vidya has been telling me about. I remember reading in a few places that sparrows are vanishing from places where they were once abundant. The fact was brought home to me when Smitha told me a couple of weeks ago that we should do something about it. Since then I have been keeping an eye out for sparrows. I know that there a few around my house - I recognize their chirruping everyday, but I had never seen them. Vidya and I were talking about this, and she told me one day that she had seen a couple of them, one of them with only one leg.

The Sparrow in my Drumstick Tree

Early one morning, I was on my way out when I spotted the one-legged sparrow. But I was in a hurry and did not have the time to stop and make his acquaintance. Today, he was in my drumstick tree, showing off, chirruping, and more importantly, posing for me. I got some good pictures of him. Hopefully, one of these days, I will have the privilege of making the acquaintance of his kinsmen as well. Sparrows have always been part of our childhoods - they would nest in the tiled roofs of our houses, their noisy chirruping competed with the cawing of the crows to fill the soundscape of our mornings, they would have to be shooed off from the grains put out to dry on sunny days... They were always there, and they were always there in abundance. I remember hand-rearing sparrows in my boyhood. They kept falling out of their nests from our roof, and we couldn't put them back. some survived, some died - but they were always there, and were always there in abundance. Such a common creature, the sparrow also populated our stories and was also part of common idiom - forced trips to the barber shop were preceded by several days of your mom comparing your hair to a sparrow's nest. They were always there, and were always there in abundance. We, my peers and I, are sufficiently far away from boyhood to talk fondly about it. Unfortunately, along with our boyhood, the sparrows too seem to have disappeared. A website devoted to saving the sparrows, and a few other bloggers on saving the sparrow: Prerna Bindra, Amit R Verma, Mearl Colaco
This entry was posted in Birds, Hyderabad and tagged , , .

2 Comments

  1. Dhruv Shanker 3 May 2010 at 15:48 #

    Nice! You need to give him a name.

  2. drongo 21 August 2010 at 14:03 #

    reminds me of the one-legged crow who lived near my old place. always used to wonder why had only one leg..but a mighty determined fella he was!

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